Shadow In Canva: Add an Image Drop or Text Shadow to Your Designs

So after putting together my post and video on how to outline text in Canva, I received some comments that it’s not truly an outline and is more of a shadow. First, depending on the angle you set the background text, you can achieve as-close-to-outline as possible.

Second, shadowing is a bit of a different approach, but I’ll admit, the process is very similar.

Either way, I thought it would be valuable to put together something on shadowing specifically, as the term itself has different meanings, and each of you has a different need, whether it’s adding shadow to an illustration, text shadow, image shadow, etc.

Canva Text Shadow

So as I’ve learned with Canva, while it is an awesome tool, along with others like Snappa (disclosure: this is an affiliate link, which means if you click it and eventually make a purchase, I’ll receive a small commission, and at no extra cost to you), to achieve some things you’d typically be able to do with a click of a button, you actually have to piece them together yourself. It’s not difficult to do so, it’s just knowing how to do it, and then doing it enough to where you really don’t have to think about it moving forward.

Shadowing text is one of those things, and really just involves a few steps:

  1. Select and add text
  2. Copy your text layer
  3. Change your new text to a different color
  4. Position one layer over the other at your preferred angle

Honestly, it’s so simple. Here is a quick visual breakdown followed by the video at the end.

Adding the text…

Copying the text layer…

Changing the color of your new layer…

Positioning one behind the other!

Canva Drop Shadow, Images

Now, with photos and images, there are a few different ways to go about creating the shadow.

One, as seen above, the moon’s shadow is created just like we did with the text.

  1. Add an image, shape, or element
  2. Copy that element
  3. Change the color of one of your elements
  4. Place one behind the other

You can also mess with the transparency for the desired look. Here it is on a white background for better visibility:

If you have a photo, the easiest thing to do is to grab one of the frames with a built-in shadow. I’ve seen a couple come and go, but right now you have the following options:

They are a little tough to find because you can’t easily see the shadow on the frame in the preview. But, and it sounds silly, if you look at the spacing between all of the frames, you’ll notice those with shadows actually have more space between them.

Meaning, even if you look at this image with the arrow, the space the arrow is pointing to is greater than that between, say, the two frames above it. Does that make sense?

All you have to do is add the frame and then add your photo to the frame and you’re all set.

Now, if you don’t want your photo in the shape of the given frames, you can still achieve a shadow, it just won’t be as sharp. And, of course, it’s the same process followed above with the text and moon. Just place your photo, either in a frame or not, add a shape of the same size, change the color of the shape and place it behind the image.

All of the above is captured in video below. Hope this helps! If not, let me know your questions and/or how I can make it better.
 

About Ryan 12 Articles
Ryan started Rent My Words to help everyday people, (beginners without any experience, basically) find success with freelance writing on platforms like Upwork and others.